3 Things to Know About Eye Makeup and Your Eyes

From eyeliner to make your eyes pop and shadow to highlight the color of your eyes, eye makeup is a natural part of many beauty routines. These products are applied all around the eyes, so some particles can slip into the delicate organ and generate problems that require an eye exam in North Syracuse. If you wear eye makeup on a daily basis, be sure to take a look at some important things to know about eye makeup and your visual health.

1. Low-quality makeup can put your eyes at risk

When it comes to applying makeup so close to your eyes, it is ever-important to ensure you know the products well. Knock-off makeup mimicking expensive brands has grown to be a major problem over the last few years. Unfortunately, some of these products contain dangerous ingredients you wouldn’t want anywhere near your eyes. Sometimes, even low-quality brands can put your visual health at risk because of questionable ingredients. So always shop for eye makeup from brands with a reputable name, and trust only legitimate retailers.

2. Old makeup can cause problems with eyelash mites

If you have certain eye makeup products that you don’t use often, be mindful of their suggested shelf life. Also, some products should be replaced frequently. For example, mascara and eyeliner should generally be replaced about every three months. Not replacing eye makeup frequently can cause an over-accumulation of Demodex brevis (eyelash mites) in the product and around your eyes.

3. Some makeup may cause issues with dry eyes

People with sensitive eyes know that certain types of eye makeup can cause issues with dry eyes. For example, some people cannot wear waterproof mascara or eyeshadow with metallic pigments. However, in many cases, makeup can cause dry eyes for people who do not normally have issues. If you start experiencing redness, burning, and discomfort, try switching brands or types of makeup to see if the problem persists.

Discuss Eye Health with a North Syracuse Eye Doctor

When it comes to protecting your eyes, there are so many good habits to adopt now that make a difference. If you are concerned about your visual health or need tips about healthy eye makeup, talk to a North Syracuse eye doctor. Reach out to us at McPherson Optometry to schedule your appointment today.

3 Ways Lack of Sleep Affects Your Visual Health

How much sleep have you been getting lately? If you are like a lot of Americans, you simply don’t get enough sleep. About 35 percent of American adults get less than the recommended seven hours of sleep every night. Unfortunately, lack of sleep is not just bad for your general health, but also your visual health. In fact, some general vision problems in North Syracuse may be related to lack of sleep. Take a look at some of the ways lack of sleep can affect your eyes.

Lack of sleep can lead to dry eyes

When your eyes are tired, you may be more likely to have problems with decreased tear production. Over time, this can lead to issues with dry eyes, which can come along with bothersome symptoms like redness, itchiness, and even blurred vision. When you have dry eyes, your tears are not lubricating the eye lens properly, which can also mean you are more susceptible to contaminants in your environment.

Lack of sleep can contribute to eye fatigue

Eye fatigue is a serious issue, even though it is an issue that is often disregarded. When your eyes feel extremely tired, they need a break. Not getting enough sleep can mean your eyes get fatigued faster than they normally would. Tired eyes don’t produce as many tears, can suffer from damaged blood vessels, and may even have issues seeing clearly.

Lack of sleep could put you at risk of eye conditions

Certain eye conditions are directly linked to poor quality sleep. For example, people who have sleep apnea are actually at a higher risk of glaucoma. This is because sleep apnea affects the intraocular pressure on the retina, as well as the important blood vessels that feed oxygen to the retina.

Keep Your Vision in Check with the Help of a North Syracuse, NY Eye Doctor

Worried that your problems with sleep are affecting your vision? If so, it may be time to visit a North Syracuse eye doctor for advice. Even small problems can grow to be a major issue when it comes to your visual health. Reach out to us at McPherson Optometry to schedule an appointment for a checkup.

Can Strabismus be Corrected?

Strabismus is the official term for what is commonly called “crossed eyes.” However, the word strabismus indicates any abnormal alignment of the eyes. In some cases of strabismus, the eyes are not crossed entirely, but focus in slightly different directions. In fact, some mild cases of strabismus are hardly noticeable to others, although it will nearly always cause conspicuous vision problems in the person suffering with strabismus. Untreated strabismus can result in lifelong vision difficulties, such as blurred vision, chronic headaches and worse.

Different Categories of Strabismus

Strabismus can present in various ways. The way in which it presents helps the optometrist in North Syracuse, NY to diagnose, categorize and treat the condition. The different types of strabismus are:

  • Esotropia, where eyes are turned inward
  • Exotropia, where eyes are turned outward
  • Hypertropia, where eyes are turned upward
  • Hypotropia, where eyes are turned downward

Note that one or both eyes may be affected.

Can Strabismus be Treated?

Strabismus causing vision problems, but it usually also causes emotional concerns, such as lack of ability to learn, develop and grow intellectually and socially. Because the condition is so visible to others, it can result in a lack of confidence or a tendency to withdraw and isolate from society. Thankfully, there are treatments for strabismus for people of all ages, including infants. Treatment for strabismus in North Syracuse, NY is available from your optometrist.

Treatments For Strabismus

Treatment for strabismus will depend upon the age of the person, as well as the category, form and severity of the condition. Treatment options include:

  • Corrective lenses, such as eyeglasses or contact lenses
  • Special prism lenses
  • Prescription eye drops and/or ointment
  • Eye patch
  • Surgery

Remember that your optometrist will bear in mind the age and condition of the patient before recommending any treatment option. For instance, an infant can’t wear contacts or eyeglasses, but an eye patch might help. Barring non-invasive results, surgery may be necessary.

Strabismus is a condition of the eye muscles. As such, treatment is readily available and highly effective. For best results, contact your optometrist early and regularly for eye exams. The sooner that strabismus is diagnosed and treated, the faster you or your loved one can get on with life with good vision. Contact us to book your appointment now.

Could Eyestrain Be Causing Your Headaches?

Just like the other muscles in your body, your eyes get tired, too. When you stare too long at a computer screen, or when you spend long hours texting your friend from a darkened bedroom, you can overtax your eyes. This leads to a number of symptoms, including painful headaches. Your eye doctor in North Syracuse, NY, will recognize the symptoms of eye strain.

How Does Eye Strain Happen?

Eye strain is not a serious condition, and it will go away once you have a chance to rest your eyes. However, the resulting headache may linger. Many factors may contribute to eye strain, including:

  • Driving for long periods of time without taking a break
  • Sitting for too long in front of a computer, television screen, or tablet
  • Marathon reading sessions
  • Trying to read in insufficient light
  • Dry, moving air, such as that produced by air conditioning

There may be other causes of eye strain, as well. However, these are probably the most common. It’s important to take time to rest your eyes on occasion when you have to stare at an object, such as a book, for an extended period of time. This gives your eyes an opportunity to refocus and to lubricate and may help you avoid an eye strain headache.

How Do I Know Whether Eye Strain Is Causing My Headaches?

The only way to know for sure whether eye strain is the culprit is to book an appointment with your eye doctor. Headaches are generic in nature and may be caused by anything from body tension to dental problems. But there are certain symptoms that accompany headaches caused by eye strain. They include:

  • A headache that develops after a long session of staring at an object or objects
  • Pain that feels like it’s centered behind your eyes
  • No other symptoms of illness, such as nausea, present
  • Not accompanied by fever
  • Goes away when you close your eyes for a period of time

If you suspect you’re suffering from eye strain headaches in North Syracuse, NY, McPherson Optometry can help. Call today to book an appointment for a routine eye exam and a consultation with one of our experienced and friendly eye professionals.

Wire Frames Vs. Plastic – Which One Is Right For You?

It’s fun to shop for new glasses! When you’re trying to pick out new glasses frames, one of the decisions you’ll have to make is whether to choose wire frames or plastic. These materials look very different, and also feel and function differently for the glasses wearer. Knowing the difference between these materials can help you decide which type of material is right for you. Here’s what you need to know when shopping for glasses in North Syracuse, NY.

What to Know About Wire Frames

Wire frames are classic eye glasses that people have been wearing for hundreds of years. Some people prefer wire frames because they’re elegant, sophisticated, and also lightweight. Wires tend to be much thinner than plastic frames, so they’re far more understated than plastic frames.

Wire frames come with nose pads that need to be replaced periodically. Some people think nose pads can be a good thing (they’re easily adjusted to your face) while others think they’re a disadvantage (they need to be replaced by someone on a regular basis).

What to Know About Plastic Frames

Plastic frames often come in bright colors and are much more noticeable than wire frames. For some eye patients, plastic frames are considered a good thing because it’s easy to express your creative side with brightly colored plastic frames. Others don’t like the look of plastic frames and prefer the less noticeable wire frames.

One thing to be aware of if you’re considering plastic frames: they’re heavier than wire frames, and take some time for adjustment. Most people need to wear plastic frames for a few days before they find them comfortable.

How to Make the Right Decision for You

Are you wondering which type of glasses are right for you? Try some on! The best way to find the right glasses for your needs is to visit an eye doctor, get an eye exam and then sample the glasses they have on hand.

Contact your eye doctor in North Syracuse. At McPherson Optometry, we stock a range of eye glasses to meet your needs. We can help you decide whether plastic frames or wire frames are right for you. Call today to make an appointment.

Most Common Signs of Computer Vision Syndrome

As digital screens become ever more prevalent, more and more people are developing computer vision syndrome. Also known as digital eye strain, this condition starts causing symptoms after just two hours in front of a computer, tablet, or smartphone screen. Fortunately, you can reduce the strain on your eyes by wearing blue light glasses from your North Syracuse optometrist. To see if you might need these glasses, watch for the following symptoms while using digital screens.

Blurry Vision

While using digital screens, your eyes have to continually shift focus while dealing with oft-poor contrast and plenty of glare. After just a couple of hours, your eyes get tired and fail to focus properly, leaving you with blurry vision. You can help the blurriness go away by taking regular five-minute breaks each hour, but it’s not a lasting solution on its own.

Eye Irritation

Most people blink much less often than normal while looking at a digital screen, which can cause your eyes to dry out. To counteract that, your eyes may start to water, making your already blurry vision much worse. Worse yet, by the end of the day, your eyes may look red and feel rather irritated. They may even feel like they’re burning and itching even while trying to rest.

Head, Neck, and Shoulder Pain

As your eyes start feeling strained, you may change your posture to help improve your ability to focus on the screen ahead. This can quickly result in head, neck, and shoulder pain, especially if you start slouching to see the screen better. The pain may last well into the evening hours and even impact your sleep. Over time, this can make the problem much worse as your body fails to repair the damage, which normally occurs while you sleep.

At McPherson Optometry, we diagnose and treat many North Syracuse common eye conditions, including computer vision syndrome. If you’re experiencing any level of eye strain or other symptoms, feel free to give us a call at 315-458-1000 to schedule a visit. During your appointment, we can perform a full eye exam and provide the comprehensive eyecare services you need to enjoy excellent vision.

How to Protect Your Eyes From Blue Light

Blue light is all around us today. Prior to cell phones, blue light was only prevalent in televisions, for the majority of people. But today blue light is all around us. In the natural world, our eyes are exposed to all the different waves of light, and our bodies and eyes are designed to live in that world.

Our bodies are designed to respond to light in different ways. Sunlight triggers Vitamin D production increases serotonin levels and triggers the mitochondria in our cells to start energy production. But when we stare at blue light, such as looking at screens all day, a very small wavelength ends up monopolizing the cells that respond to light to act in unhealthy ways, such as lowering melatonin production at night. There is even a link between blue light exposure and lowered Vitamin B12 levels. Following are some of the best ways to protect your eye from blue light.

Use Blue Light Blocking Software

Some of the best blue light blocking software includes Flux, Nightshift, and Iris. Flux and Nightshift are free software, while Iris is paid software with a trial version. Flux is the best free choice because you can specify the level of warm or red light you want. Under the settings in iPhones, you also have the option to turn on night mode, which blocks blue light.

Use Dark Mode on Your Computer and Phone

Set the theme and background of your computer and phone to dark mode. The more white light and bright colors being emitted from your screen, the more blue light comes from it. Most computers and devices have an option for dark mode.

Wear Blue Light Blocking Lenses

There are now blue light blocking eyeglasses that you can ask your eye doctor about. These are very comfortable and do a lot to keep eyes shielded from blue light while you’re working on your computer at home or at work.

Blue light is a prominent danger to your eye health today. Making a little effort to block blue light from your devices as much as possible will help protect your eyes. With these steps in mind blue light won’t be completely gone, but it will be at a level that is less threatening.

Got a Stye On Your Eye? Home Remedies, When to Call the Eye Doctor, and More

Styes are a small, localized infection affecting hair follicles or oil glands in the eyelid. The problem is relatively common among children, who are more likely to rub their eyes. However, styes can affect anyone and can stem from not properly cleaning contact lenses, wearing certain types of makeup, and a number of other everyday actions. If you have a stye, you may find some relief with home treatment, but you should also know when to see the eye doctor for help.

Home Remedies for Mild Styes

Mild styes can usually be treated at home and will subside in a few days. In general, you will need to keep your eyelid really clean and help encourage the oils trapped in the area to drain. Try to:

  • Avoid wearing eye makeup on your eyelids for a few days
  • Take the time to clean your eyelid with baby shampoo or mild soap and water a few times daily
  • Use a warm compress made of a wet tea bag to apply gentle pressure to the area
  • Massage the area with a clean finger gently

Avoid trying to scratch, pop, or poke at the stye. This may look like a pimple, but trying to squeeze the stye can actually make the problem worse.

When to Call an Eye Doctor for Help

Even though a stye will most often go away relatively quickly, occasionally, the small issue can become a more worrisome problem. You should reach out to the eye doctor for advice if:

  • The stye appears to be growing instead of getting smaller
  • The stye seems to be interfering with your ability to see because of its size or placement
  • The stye is not going away or you have repetitive problems

Common Treatments for Eye Styes

Eye styes that are not going away on their own may require further treatment from your eye doctor. The medical professional may prescribe topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics, or other forms of medicinal treatment. In extremely rare cases, a stye will need to be surgically lanced or removed.

Call a North Syracuse Eye Doctor for Help

While styes usually go away on their own, you may occasionally need to visit your eye doctor in North Syracuse for help. If you have issues with styes or other eye health concerns, reach out to us at Mcpherson Optometry to schedule an appointment.

 

Is My Child Too Young for Glasses?

Young children can have eye problems, too. Even children as young as 12 months may need corrected vision. If you think your child may have vision issues, regardless of age, make an appointment with your local vision center today.

Symptoms of Poor Vision in Young Children

Poor vision often manifests in children between the ages of 18 months and 4 years old. Sometimes, the problem is easy to recognize as a wandering or “lazy” eye. Crossed eyes is another symptom of vision issues in young children. If your child suffers from either of these conditions, you and your pediatrician will likely both notice.

Sometimes, young children have vision problems that are less noticeable, such as uneven focus. Because they’ve had the condition since birth and have never seen the world differently, they won’t notice there’s a problem. This is when your child’s routine vision screenings become vital.

Symptoms of poor vision in very young children include:

  • Sensitivity to light
  • Redness
  • Eye rubbing
  • Crust
  • Swelling or tearing
  • Bulging eyes
  • Drooping eyelids

If you notice these symptoms in your child, regardless of age, schedule a vision screening.

How Do Young Children Manage Glasses?

If your very young child needs glasses, don’t despair. The key is to purchase ones that are durable and resist breakage. You may also want to purchase extended protection plans for glasses meant for youngsters.

To help young children manage and care for glasses, first find out how often they need to wear them. It may also be helpful to let your child help pick out their glasses. When kids play a role in choosing, they’re often more invested in caring for them. Once you’re home with the new glasses, have a sit-down conversation with your youngster to discuss how important it is to take care of them. Outline rules to help, such as storing the glasses in their case when not in use and taking them off before engaging in active play.

Contact McPherson Optometry in Syracuse, NY

Call McPherson Optometry in the North Syracuse area today to schedule an appointment for children who exhibit signs of vision problems. Our friendly professionals are waiting to help.

 

Does Wearing Eyeglasses improve Eyesight?

Wearing glasses has numerous benefits, including correcting your vision and protecting your eyes from UV light. If you care for your glasses well, they can last for three years without replacing the frames. If you have recently started wearing eyeglasses, here is what you should know about your eyesight.

Will Eyeglasses Improve Your Eyesight?

Wearing glasses will help improve your eyesight only when you are wearing them. If you want your vision to improve without wearing glasses, you will have to treat your eye issues’ root cause. Your glasses will only correct your sight based on your existing prescription. When you remove them, your vision tends to revert to normal. The best thing is that your eyeglasses can correct your sight to 20/20, or better, depending on your eyes. For example, having 20/70 to 20/160 vision when wearing eyeglasses might indicate that you have low vision. In such a situation, you may require special lenses or additional steps to help improve your vision. In some cases, presbyopia can cause your eyesight to deteriorate as you grow older. Frequent comprehensive eye exams are essential because they help you get help before your symptoms worsen.

Will Your Eyesight Become Worse If You Don’t Wear Eyeglasses?

Not wearing glasses will not damage your eyes; however, it might cause your vision loss symptoms to recur. Some common symptoms of farsightedness include tired eyes, headaches, and agitation. If you have been using glasses, you probably noted that these symptoms disappeared. However, not wearing eyeglasses might cause eye issues to resurface. If you do not want the symptoms to recur, it is best to wear your glasses as per your doctor’s recommendations. Your prescription will often include the frequency of wearing them after your eye examination. You shouldn’t worry if you cannot wear your glasses all the time because you might not have to. If you have been wondering whether wearing eyeglasses improves your eyesight, the answer to that is that they do. However, there is no indication that they affect your physical eye or the source of your sight loss symptoms.

You should expect your vision to improve when wearing glasses because they will help correct your eye issues. Choosing not to wear glasses can cause some eyesight loss symptoms to recur. It is best to wear your glasses as recommended by your eye doctor.