Got a Stye On Your Eye? Home Remedies, When to Call the Eye Doctor, and More

Styes are a small, localized infection affecting hair follicles or oil glands in the eyelid. The problem is relatively common among children, who are more likely to rub their eyes. However, styes can affect anyone and can stem from not properly cleaning contact lenses, wearing certain types of makeup, and a number of other everyday actions. If you have a stye, you may find some relief with home treatment, but you should also know when to see the eye doctor for help.

Home Remedies for Mild Styes

Mild styes can usually be treated at home and will subside in a few days. In general, you will need to keep your eyelid really clean and help encourage the oils trapped in the area to drain. Try to:

  • Avoid wearing eye makeup on your eyelids for a few days
  • Take the time to clean your eyelid with baby shampoo or mild soap and water a few times daily
  • Use a warm compress made of a wet tea bag to apply gentle pressure to the area
  • Massage the area with a clean finger gently

Avoid trying to scratch, pop, or poke at the stye. This may look like a pimple, but trying to squeeze the stye can actually make the problem worse.

When to Call an Eye Doctor for Help

Even though a stye will most often go away relatively quickly, occasionally, the small issue can become a more worrisome problem. You should reach out to the eye doctor for advice if:

  • The stye appears to be growing instead of getting smaller
  • The stye seems to be interfering with your ability to see because of its size or placement
  • The stye is not going away or you have repetitive problems

Common Treatments for Eye Styes

Eye styes that are not going away on their own may require further treatment from your eye doctor. The medical professional may prescribe topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics, or other forms of medicinal treatment. In extremely rare cases, a stye will need to be surgically lanced or removed.

Call a North Syracuse Eye Doctor for Help

While styes usually go away on their own, you may occasionally need to visit your eye doctor in North Syracuse for help. If you have issues with styes or other eye health concerns, reach out to us at Mcpherson Optometry to schedule an appointment.

 

When Eye Floaters Can Be a Sign to Call the Eye Doctor for Help

They look like strings to some, cobwebs to others, and sometimes take on the appearance of bugs, specks, or spots. Their colors can range from white to black and every shade in between. Eye floaters are a detached matter from the intricate parts of the eye that cast a shadow on the retinal nerve. Here are a few situations when eye floaters may be something you need to talk to your eye doctor about.

The floater is so large that it disrupts your vision.

Floaters can look vastly different depending on what is causing them, but they can also range in size rather dramatically. If you have a tiny floater, there is a better chance that the visual disruption will subside within a few days. However, if you have a floater so large it is making it hard to see out of the affected eye, it is definitely a sign that you need to seek a professional’s advice. Eye floaters of this size rarely go away on their own; surgical intervention may be necessary.

The floater does not go away on its own within a few days.

Floaters do not necessarily “go away.” What normally occurs is your eyes grow accustomed to seeing in spite of the floater as if it is no longer there. This explains why an eye floater can seem relatively significant at first but as time goes on, you have to really concentrate to see it. Nevertheless, some floating matter in the field of vision may not subside or may not be something your eyes can adjust to. In these instances, it is best to have an eye doctor take a look.

The floater is accompanied by other symptoms of eye health risks.

Floaters are relatively common, and they are usually not anything to be severely concerned about. However, if these visual disturbances are accompanied by other symptoms of eye health risks, it is critical that you seek the advice of your eye doctor right away. A few additional symptoms that should spur you to call for an appointment include:

  • You feel pain or pressure in the affected eye
  • You experience drastic changes in your visual abilities
  • Your vision seems cloudy or dark

Don’t Let Eye Floaters Scare You – Contact Your North Syracuse Eye Doctor

Something floating in your field of vision is never a welcome thing, and, yes, eye floaters can be rather alarming. If it has been a while since you’ve had your visual health assessed or you have floaters you are concerned about, reach out to us at McPherson Optometry in North Syracuse, NY for an appointment.

Warning Signs That Vision Problems Might Be Developing

If you are worried that you might be developing eye problems there are certain signs you can look out for to determine if you might have visual

problems in the future.

 

Temporary Blurriness when Refocusing

You might find you have blurriness when you refocus your eyes, or when you wake up there might be blurriness. Try avoiding screens and televisions for a period of time to see if this resolves the issue. Signs to watch out for is if episodes like this occur more frequently over the following weeks to months.

 

White Spots in Vision

If you notice white spots in your vision that aren’t stars caused by a rush of blood to the head then could be a warning sign of a coming vision problem. You may notice white spots in your vision that either stay when you look at them or go away. This is usually an atypical vision problem and is cause for concern, as it’s probably something that will need the attention of an optometrist. A serious warning sign is if it frequently occurs and doesn’t go away over days to weeks.

 

Haziness in Vision

If you notice a hazy fog or just haziness in your vision, it’s another warning sign. Your vision might look more generally white and blurred out. This could be caused by UV damage from staring at sources of UV

light like the sun, or visiting a tanning bed. If this is the case, wait 24 hours to see if the haziness goes away on its own. If it doesn’t, contact your eye doctor. If you haven’t been exposed to UV light as far as you know, and you still have haziness in vision, seek medical attention as you may be experiencing the beginning stages of a serious vision problem.

 

Itchy Eyes

If you feel like your eyeballs are itchy it’s probable that swelling is occurring in your eyes. This could be caused by UV damage. If the problem persists beyond a day or two, seek help from your eye doctor.

 

All sorts of eye problems can occur, but many of them are treatable if you catch them early enough. If you notice any of the above signs of vision problems, contact your eye doctor right away.

Retinal Detachment 101 | A Brief Explanation of the Condition

Of all of the optometric conditions that can detrimentally affect the eyes, retinal detachment is one of the most worrisome. This condition can be related to age, but it can also be related to something like uncontrolled diabetes or an inflammatory disease. Take a look at some of the things you should know about retinal detachment and what you should do if you suspect this could be the cause of your vision problems.

Retinal Detachment Explained

Retinal detachment is a dangerous optometric condition that affects the thin layer of retinal cells that rest at the back of the eye. The layer of retinal cells pulls away and it prevents oxygen and blood from being fed to the eye so that it can continue to function properly. There are three different types of retinal attachment: Rhegmatogenous, tractional, and exudative. Each type of retinal detachment has its own suspected group of causes and may be treated in a different way.

Symptoms of Retinal Detachment

Retinal detachment is usually easily pointed out because the symptoms can be so obvious, and they can come about quite suddenly for most patients. Some of the most common symptoms of retinal detachment include:

  • Peripheral or side vision that seems to be gradually declining
  • The appearance of multiple specks or strings in your field of vision (floaters)
  • Feeling like there is a shadow over your field of vision
  • Vision that is blurred lighter than usual
  • Seeing sudden flashes of light in your vision

Immediate Care Is Critical

If you have experienced retinal detachment, it is considered an emergency situation. If you do not act promptly and get the care that you need, you could be at risk of losing your vision completely. As soon as you recognize symptoms of the condition, reach out to an eye doctor for advice. Even if you are wrong and retinal detachment is not to blame, all of the related symptoms are considered serious.

Contact Us for an Appointment in North Syracuse, NY

Retinal detachment is a serious optometric concern, and it should be immediately assessed by a professional. If you suspect you have experienced retinal detachment, please reach out to us at McPherson Optometry in North Syracuse New York for an immediate appointment.

What is a Detached Retina?

Retinal detachment is a serious condition because of the risk it carries for vision loss. The condition is not common, but it’s not exactly rare, either. If you think that you have retinal detachment, contact your eye doctor immediately. If the situation develops after hours, head to the emergency room.

What Happens With Retinal Detachment?

The cornea is a clear covering that allows light to enter the eye. Together, the cornea and lens focus light onto the retina which acts very much like film in a camera. The process leading to a retinal detachment usually begins with a retinal tear, followed by a small detachment that progressively increases in size. As the retina detaches from the wall of the eye, it loses function. Subsequently, you lose all or part of your vision.

One major contributor to retinal detachment is the Vitreous, a component of the eye. Usually, changes in the vitreous happen over time or age. The vitreous is the gel that fills the hollow space in the center of the eye and is about 98% water. The vitreous is a matrix of collagen fibers. In youth, the vitreous is quite uniform, but over time things change. Two key changes happen; one is that pockets of liquid form in the body of the vitreous and second, the vitreous may progressively separate from its attachments to the back part of the retina.

What Causes Retinal Detachment?

Retinal detachment can come about from an injury, changes in the biology of the eye or as a result of another condition or occurrence. In addition to age, there are several risk factors for developing a retinal tear. Among them are previous cataract surgeries, trauma, or significant nearsightedness. A retinal tear is most often caused by a vitreous pulling on a part of the retina where it is strongly attached. A detached retina can cause blindness, nearsightedness, clouded vision, and other associated eye-related diseases.

A detached retina will often happen in stages before it is completely detached. Common warning symptoms of a detached retina in the beginning stages are light flashes, floaters, and missing pockets of vision. You should contact your eye doctor promptly if you are experiencing any of the above symptoms. The sooner you get to a doctor, the easier it is to repair and restore your vision.

What Are Ocular Migraines?

An ocular migraine is a frightening condition that can leave you with temporary vision loss in one eye. It is sometimes referred to as a retinal migraine. Although some people also use the term “ocular migraine” to refer to visual migraines, the two conditions are not the same. Visual migraines affect both eyes, typically only last about 30 minutes and are much more common than true ocular migraines. In fact, about 20 percent of all migraines occur with auras.

woman suffering from ocular migraines

On the other hand, true retinal migraines typically affect a single eye for about an hour and are much rarer. Only about one out of every 200 people who have migraines will be affected by this condition. If you are unsure whether or not you are having an ocular (retinal) or visual migraine, cover one eye at a time. If you notice that the symptoms are only in a single eye, you are experiencing an ocular migraine.

Symptoms of Ocular Migraines

Some of the symptoms of an ocular migraine include seeing flashes of lights, floating lines and zigzag patterns. You may also experience spots that may cause partial to complete temporary blindness. These symptoms may occur at the same time as or after a migraine headache, which will typically be felt behind the eye in which you are noticing symptoms.

The exact cause of migraines is not known, but it is believed that they may be the result of spasms in your blood vessels. In ocular migraines, the reduction in blood flow occurs in the retina. For visual migraines, the change occurs in the blood flow to the occipital lobe or visual cortex, which is the area of your brain that is responsible for vision. Because visual migraines are a result of an issue occurring in the brain, you will still have symptoms even if you close your eyes, which is not true in the case of ocular migraines.

The loss of vision in one eye can also be a symptom of other serious conditions, such as a retinal detachment, so it is very important to consult with an eye doctor as soon as possible.